Archive

I’m still here!

2012-05-03 23:41:04 by Kjell-Åke Gafvelin

For a while now I haven’t spent any time on this blog even though I have been thinking on a regular basis “that was interesting and I need to blog about it”. But then there has always been something that has come in between and I forgot what it was that was so interesting…

Some weeks ago I finally made a push to get the release of MSMQ Studio out through the door and I was going to make a blog post about it just to realize that I was not able to post it! I had moved the blog to a new webhost about a year ago and now there was a problem with the login provider. So I went off to try to debug the code for the blog, but I couldn’t find it! After a while I managed to retrieve it from a really old backup thanks to my Windows Home Server! So now the code is up on TFS Preview so I have some control of it. Backups AND good source control is a god send sometimes!

So when I had this sorted out I added Google Analytics logging to the blog just to see how traffic was flowing from the blog to my company site (http://archonaut.com). This was really one of the best things I have done to get some inspiration to start blogging again! When I looked at the results from the first day and checked out the referrals I noticed that there are some old blog posts that people are still finding useful and are linking to those! This made me happy that they are still providing value to someone!

This blog has existed for almost 10 years now and I will do my best on keeping it up and running and adding more valuable content!

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AssemblyAttribute explained–Part 2

2012-05-29 10:25:55 by Kjell-Åke Gafvelin

There has been some interest in my blog post AssemblyAttribute explained regarding how build numbers are calculated from the date when the application was compiled. So I thought I could also make a post on how to calculate the date from the build number.

So if you have set the AssemblyVersionAttribute in your application to the following:

   1:  [assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.*")]

you could calculate the date from the build number using the following code snippet:

   1:              Version version = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Version;
   2:   
   3:              DateTime date = new DateTime(2000, 1, 1);
   4:   
   5:              date = date.AddDays(version.Build);
   6:   
   7:              date = date.AddSeconds(version.Revision * 2);
   8:   
   9:              if (date.IsDaylightSavingTime())
  10:                  date = date.Add(TimeZone.CurrentTimeZone.GetDaylightChanges(date.Year).Delta);
  11:   
  12:              Console.WriteLine(version.ToString() + " => " + date.ToString());

This code snipped would output this:

1.0.4532.14997 => 2012-05-29 09:19:54

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Switching to FeedBurner

2012-05-31 09:18:48 by Kjell-Åke Gafvelin

In the coming weeks I will switch over the feed for this blog to be delivered by FeedBurner. So to prepare yourself I recommend that you update the URL to the feed in your feedreader now.

http://feeds.feedburner.com/geekprojectcom

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